Uncollected Stephen King short stories

Below is a list of all of the known uncollected short stories by Stephen King. ‘Uncollected’ here means not in any of King’s short story or novella collections. Any corrections or contributions, please e-mail to MaxDevore@hotmail.com

I’m not going to include those absolutely impossible things to get, like “People, Places and Things” which have never been legitimately published anywhere.

The Lost Works of Stephen King, by Steve Spignesi and Stephen King: Uncollected, Unpublished by Rocky Wood with David Rawsthorne & Norma Blackburn go into further detail about hard-to-find, obscure, and impossible-to-find stories and articles by SK.


  • “Codename: Mousetrap,” The Drum, 1965 (Lisbon High School newspaper)
  • “The 43rd Dream,” The Drum, January, 1966. (Lisbon High School newspaper). Reprinted in The Stephen King Illustrated Companion.
  • “I Was a Teenage Grave Robber,” Comics Review, 1965. One installment reprinted in The Stephen King Illustrated Companion.
  • “The Glass Floor”, Startling Mystery Stories, Fall of 1967. King’s first professional sale. Reprinted in the Fall 1990 issue of Weird Tales and in Cemetery Dance magazine, issue #68.
  • “The Blue Air Compressor,” originally published in the University of Maine literary magazine Onan, 1971, but more popularly available in its Heavy Metal magazine appearance. The text was revised for this July 1981 reprinting.
  • “Weeds” (seen as “The Lonesome Death of Jordy Verrill” in Creepshow). Originally appeared in Cavalier in May of 1976. Later reprinted in Nugget magazine in April of 1979 and in Shivers VII in 2013.
  • “Man with a Belly”, Cavalier, December 1978 and Gent, Nov/Dec 1979.
  • “Night of the Tiger”, Fantasy and Science Fiction, 1978. Reprinted later in More Tales of Unknown Horror (1979), The Year’s Best Horror Stories (1979) and Chamber of Horrors (1984).
  • “The Crate,” originally appeared in Gallery magazine in 1979 and later collected in The Arbor House Treasury of Horror and the Supernatural in 1981. King also wrote the introduction to that anthology. Reprinted in Shivers VI.
  • “Before the Play”, Whispers, 1982. This is a lengthy introductory section which was cut from The Shining. An abridged version appeared in the April 6-May 2, 1997 issue of TV Guide.
  • “Skybar,” a do-it-yourself story from 1982 with many authors contributing sections to the story. King’s part amounted to five paragraphs.
  • “For the Birds” in Bred Any Good Rooks Lately?, 1986. King contributed a 1-page story which had to end with a pun.
  • “The Reploids” — appeared with “Dedication” and “The Sneakers” in Night Visions V, 1988, along with some excellent stories by George R.R. Martin and Dan Simmons. The anthology was released in paperback under the title The Skin Trade.
  • “The Revelations of ‘Becka Paulson” — first appeared in Rolling Stone magazine in the July 19/August 2, 1984 double issue. This one is an exception to the rule, as it HAS appeared in an SK collection, the Scream Press limited edition of Skeleton Crew and then was later extensively modified for a scene in The Tommyknockers. Also appears in the collection I Shudder at Your Touch. Adapted as an Outer Limits episode starring and directed by Steven Weber.
  • “The Killer”, Famous Monsters of Filmland #202, Spring ’94
  • “Jhonathan and the Witches”, from an anthology called First Words.
  • * “Blind Willie” appeared in an anthology, not widely available, entitled Antaeus: The Final Volume. (Ecco Press). Revised substantially to be included in Hearts in Atlantis.” Also included in the U.K. paperback of Bag of Bones.
  • “The Hotel at the End of the Road,” one of the stories from “People, Places, Things,” appeared in The Market Guide for Young Writers, 5th ed.  edited by Kathy Henderson.
  • “General,” a screenplay for the third segment of the movie Cat’s Eye, is available in Screamplays, edited by Richard Chizmar.
  • “The Old Dude’s Ticker,” a short story, appears in the NECON XX program book. Limited to a mere 333 copies, this is a hard one to find. The short story is co-authored by Edgar Alan Poe and is a retelling of The Telltale Heart. Written in the early 1970′s and rejected by Cavalier. Reprinted in The Big Book of NECON in 2008.
  • “The Plant” — published in three installments by King’s own Philtrum Press and given out as Christmas gifts to friends. Very limited in numbers. Planned to be an epistolery novel, aborted when King decided it was getting to be too much like Little Shop of Horrors. Revived in 2000 as a serial eBook available at www.stephenking.com in monthly installments starting in July.
  • “The Tale of Gray Dick,” a reworked excerpt from Wolves of the Calla. McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern, issue 10 and McSweeney’s Mammoth Treasury of Thrilling Tales. March 2003.
  • “Lisey and the Madman,” McSweeney’s Enchanted Chamber of Astonishing Stories, November 2004 and New Beginnings, spring 2005.
  • “Throttle,” with Joe Hill, He Is Legend: Celebrating Richard Matheson, Gauntlet Press, Feb 2009.
  • “Ur,” available only through Amazon for Kindle, February 2009.
  • “Morality,” Esquire, summer 2009.
  • “Premium Harmony,” The New Yorker, November 9, 2009.
  • “Herman Wouk is Still Alive,” The Atlantic, May 2011.
  • “Under the Weather,” bonus story in paperback edition of Full Dark, No Stars, May 2011.
  • “Mile 81,” eBook only novella from Scribner, September 1, 2011.
  • “The Little Green God of Agony,” A Book of Horrors, September 2011.
  • “The Dune,” Granta’s Fall/Winter issue, October 27, 2011.
  • “In the Tall Grass” (with Joe Hill), Esquire. Part 1: June/July 2012; Part 2: August 2012.
  • “A Face in The Crowd” (with Stewart O’Nan), eBook/audio, August 21, 2012.
  • “Batman and Robin Have an Altercation,” Harper’s Magazine, September 2012.
  • “Afterlife,” Tin House #56, June 2013.
  • “The Rock and Roll Dead Zone,” Hard Listening, June 2013.
  • “Summer Thunder,” Turn Down the Lights, Cemetery Dance Publications, December 2013.
  • “Bad Little Kid,” March 2014. Originally published as an eBook only in French (title: Sale Gosse) and German (title: Böser kleiner Junge)

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